Travel

Relationship Benefits of Travelling Frequently with Your Significant Other

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Travel is at once a rich venue of new experiences and memories as well as a testing ground for the strength of relationships. Research confirms that there are many relationship benefits of travelling frequently with your SO.

 

👇👇😃 Tag your bae 💕

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Relationship Benefits of Travelling as a Couple

Conde Nast Traveler cites the following relevant studies:

 

Venue for Romance

  • Couples that took regular trips reported higher levels of satisfaction with their relationships, and considered their vacations an important venue for romance. This is according to a 2012 survey by the U.S. Travel Association.

 

Improved Communication and Connectivity

  • Experts at Texas A&M found that partners who traveled together experienced improved communication, and that connectivity extended into their life back home—with one important caveat. For the couple to reap such benefits, they must want the same thing out of the vacation, and that experience must include shared activities that nurture the relationship. This was published in a 2013 article in the Journal of Travel Research.

Dr. James Petrick, professor of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences and co-author of the Texas A&M review, clarifies:

“Vacation experiences are made up of seeking and escaping motives. Some are seeking adventure; others are escaping and want to relax. The dyad has to match up. Outside of your usual environment, you have to process much more and evaluate situations in an in-depth manner. Vacations awaken all your senses. You’re more in tune with each other, with the environment around you.”

 

Couple goals all the way 👫💘

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Boosts in Relationship Quality

  • A 2000 study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that long-term couples, who participated in new, exciting activities together—like regular travel—experienced boosts in relationship quality.

 

This is supported by Dr. Jaime Kurtz, associate professor of psychology at James Madison University and author of the book The Happy Traveler: Unpacking the Secrets of Better Vacations, who says,

 “It promotes novelty. If you normally see one another as partners in child-rearing and housework, this isn’t always so romantic. Breaking out of those roles can give you the chance to rekindle romance and see one another in new ways.”

 

Tag the one you would want to share this with 😍😍😍

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Plus, check out the 99% success rate of the Malaysian government’s Second Honeymoon Programme in 2010, This was aimed at helping revive relationships on the brink of divorce. So if you are looking at long-term relationships, plan some travel time soon to reap the many relationship benefits of travelling with the one you love.

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